UNDERESTIMATING TYPE AND QUANTITY OF DOCUMENTATION WHEN MAXIMIZING REIMBURSABLE COSTS

UNDERESTIMATING TYPE AND QUANTITY OF DOCUMENTATION WHEN MAXIMIZING REIMBURSABLE COSTS

 

Author | Joseph Gross

 

I mentioned in the first part of this series the importance of monitors in debris operations. This can’t be stressed enough. While having debris monitors is a crucial aspect of debris operations, monitors alone cannot provide you enough support for maximum reimbursement, though.

 

Think of a debris operation as an automobile. It not only needs an engine (monitors) to run properly, but fuel (documentation) for the engine to produce your desired result.

 

Along with monitors, you need to provide the proper documentation to support the monitoring activities. One of the biggest mistakes I have seen nationwide is the underestimating of the documentation needed for an effective debris operation, or the complete lack thereof. The documentation can pile up and get out of control quickly and often exceeds thousands of pages.

 

At the very least, every debris operation should contain hard copy AND electronic documentation such as:

 

  • Load Tickets
  • Truck Certifications
  • Monitor Daily Logs including mileage logs
  • Pictures

 

Additional recommended documentation includes:

 

  • Incident Reports including equipment malfunctions
  • List of Disposal sites with hours and what is NOT allowed at each one
  • Maps containing eligible areas and type of debris

TIPS FOR PROVIDING THE RIGHT TYPE AND QUANTITY OF DOCUMENTATION WHEN MAXIMIZING REIMBURSABLE COSTS AFTER A DISASTER:

 

Tip #1: Keep your documentation uniform and organized.

 

By having all your daily logs, truck certifications, load tickets, etc., look the same no matter who or where they are being filled out, you will make the documentation process easier. It will help when needing to aggregate the documentation because you always know where to look and what you are looking for. Most importantly, it will greatly expedite the reimbursement process, as well, and at the end of the day, getting reimbursed is really what it is all about.

 

Tip #2: Have COMPLETE and LEGIBLE load tickets.

 

Having an electronic ticket system that can be filled out on site is great. Having pre-ordered load tickets that contain multi-carbon copy pages is great. Having tickets, whether they are electronic or paper, and not containing all the relevant data needed for the ticket, is not great.

One of the biggest reasons FEMA will de-obligate individual load tickets is there is some justification to doubt that it was for eligible debris. Missing fields, fields filled out incorrectly, or just plain illegible writing can lead to that ticket being worth as much as the paper it is printed on. Ensure each load ticket is completely filled out, correctly and legibly, on all copies if you are using hard copy ticket books.

 

FOR MORE TIPS ON HOW TO MANAGE AND ORGANIZE DEBRIS OPERATION DOCUMENTATION INCLUDING HOW TO RUN AN EFFICIENT ADMS, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT ME AT JOSEPH.GROSS@CDRMAGUIRE.COM OR FILL OUT THE “ROAD TO RECOVERY ASSESSMENT” WITH YOUR QUESTION.

 

Also, make sure to follow me on Twitter for current emergency management news and tools @JoeAtCDRMaguire.